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Heartland Outdoors turkey hunt Illinois may 2018

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Conservation Corner

Farmers Keeping Nutrients on the Field, out of streams

Fri, August 24, 2018

An excellent article on Farmers and their efforts to keep nutrients on the field out of streams.


#ConservationRoadtrip stops in Ohio and visits soil health advocate David Brandt.

http://nrcs.maps.arcgis.com/apps/Cascade/index.html?appid=fb509cf9a9eb4918b9e847354f724d26


To learn about incentives for no till, strip till, cover crops under EQIP and CSP, visit your local NRCS Field office.

 

 

Comments

This article must of been written by a farmer… because this is the farthest from the truth.  We see more tree lines cleared and highly erodible soils tilled than ever before.  Farmers are one of the worst stewards of the land that there is.. if there is one tree shading one row of corn, you can guarantee that it will be cut down.  Little to no riparian buffer strips and don’t even get me started on all of the tiling that farmers place in their fields.

Posted by FULLDRAW on August 28

Actually its not written by a farmer.  Its part of a Conservation Road trip across the country showcasing all the different conservation efforts going on all over the nation.  if farmers were the worst stewards of the land, and not interested in conserving their natural resources, I would not have as much to do here at work!  The demand for conservation is increasing more than we can keep up with.  In Tazewell County alone in 2017, we submitted more than $1 million in EQIP cost share applications and obligated $914,000.  In 2018 we are in the final stage of obligating $209,000 in EQIP conservation dollars.  Then the SWCD staff are completing the CRP contract re enrollments.  Re enrolling conservation buffer practices including filter strips and riparian forest buffers.  There is so much demand for CRP acres nationwide that FSA is up against the CRP 24 million acre cap.

Posted by TMalone on August 28

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