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First Shed Of The Year
Posted: 15 September 2013 02:40 PM   [ Ignore ]
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The boy and I went out for a morning squirrel hunt.  While searching for any remaining water on our property, I about tripped over this weird looking thing sticking out of the ground in the creek bank. 

I was speechless.  It is actually shed, not broke off.  I was able to pull it out of the dirt by hand, so it wasn’t too deep.  I guess the spring floods uncovered it?

I should have entered a shed contest this year.


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Posted: 15 September 2013 04:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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that could be very very old huh!

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Posted: 15 September 2013 04:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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WOW…I am to say the least INTRIGUED…....I wonder what species that is?.........I really want to hear updates about this…....I am a fossil and anything historic FREAK…..lol…that has to be the coolest find anyone could ever stumble upon during a foray into the great timber!!..DO NOT SELL….unless u sell it to me..hahahahahaha…AWESOME find Matt!!!!!

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Posted: 15 September 2013 05:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Its not fossilized or anything.  The open areas where its been chewed on is still porous like normal.  I will get some detailed pics and post them.  A buddy dug up some info that elk were last in our area in the 1850s.

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Posted: 15 September 2013 06:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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That is crazy!! Has to be an elk shed right? Any way to get it dated? Is it at all possible it was found out west and someone threw it in the timber here? Probably not eh?

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Posted: 16 September 2013 12:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I did a story on a similar find out of Spoon River in 2008. But that one looked older than this one.

BY JEFF LAMPE
DAHINDA — It’s an understatement to say Stanley Gooding goes fishing on the Spoon River.
“I spend as much time looking as I do fishing,” Dahinda resident Gooding said.
All his looking paid off last Sunday. While wetting a line for channel catfish Gooding discovered an elk skull with partial antlers still attached.
“I walked past it once and at first I just thought it was part of a tree root,” Gooding said of the skull, stained brown from years in sand and mud.
Ridges at the base of a 16-inch antler caused Gooding to stop — as did his unusual firsthand knowledge. Gooding’s father, Lee, found half of an elk skull about 30 years ago along the Spoon River.
That’s a rare feat, since the odds of finding one elk skull are rather long. The last wild elk were killed off in Illinois in the 1850s. You have to go back to the 1700s to find a time when the big cervids were fairly common in the Prairie State.
Assigning an exact age to Gooding’s elk skull is difficult, since aging is often based on other items found near bones said Michael Conner, associate curator of anthropolgy at Dickson
Mounds Museum.
“We’ve been working in one 700-year-old site that has lots of elk bone,” Conner said. He has also seen elk remains up to 10,000 years old.
“Prehistorically if you are above the Sangamon River you can expect to see an elk bone in almost any excavation you do, mainly after about 8,000 years ago,” said Alan Harn, an assistant curator of anthropology at Dickson Mounds.
Radiocarbon dating is also possible. But the process is expensive. And finding an exact age isn’t critical to Gooding. He’s happy to be part of a select group, since the only other
Spoon River elk skull he knows of was found by the late Virgil Williamson of London Mills while hawging for catfish.
“Makes you wonder what it was like to hunt around here when there were elk walking,” Gooding said.

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Posted: 16 September 2013 07:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Here are a couple close up pics.  If you look at these and the others, the dark areas were buried and the lighter areas were not and were chewed on.  I have to assume this was uncovered during the spring floods and the critters chewed on it this year.  We will never know.




Thanks for the article from 2008 Jeff.  At least I know this can be something from way back when.

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Posted: 17 September 2013 03:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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That thing is definitely old!  Pretty gnarly looking but that’s cool that it was found here in Illinois! 

Didn’t know the IDNR was around in the 1850’s making money off of elk tags til they were gone!!  Interesting!!

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Posted: 17 September 2013 12:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Thats amazing! Thanks for sharing

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Posted: 18 September 2013 09:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Now that’s a kick-butt find!!!!Good job matt n son…

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