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Cheap and Easy Food Plots ??
Posted: 01 February 2012 09:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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some people mix varieties of species like turnips, beets, oats, wheat.  If one does not do good the other may.  You may not have any deer in the turnips until after a freeze. 

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Posted: 02 February 2012 12:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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I think your best bet for a late season food plot is standing soybeans.  I have seen this work wonders.  I am not a believer on turnips around here, my neighbors put in a turnip plot and hardly any had been touched at all.  The spring plot I put in last year was a clover, chicory, alfalfa mix.  Early season was a success as I killed a 142” 11 point opening morning of bow season off the ground.  He was 1 out of a group of 3 MATURE bucks.  I am a big believer in food plots after that success.  Even now into Feb. the deer are still actively hitting it.

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Posted: 04 February 2012 09:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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I would make a narrow plot close to tree line, leave the rest tall grass toward the river. What I would do is bush hog the plot area as low as a cutter can, then disc it up. Yeah roundup always gets rid of grass seed, but I don’t use it on my plots, and have no problem as long as I plant heavy. I like wheat, oats, turnips, mustard greens. Don’t care for soy beans because if deer plentiful, they will go after the beans first, nip them off, then its dead, unless you fence off to protect till grown. There is a bean you can plant that will continue to grow after being nipped, forgot the name, will get it for ya. There’s also a plant called vetch that grows like a vine and leafy, really spreads. Never tried beets, but I see good things about them.  Also, after disc’ing the plot, I would use lime, it will sweeten upthe plants. Lime is inexpensive and a great help. Use the granular type. Don’t till it in, leave on top of ground. If you do use lime, leave it about 2 weeks before planting, this is what our agriculture people recommend. I do recommend fertilizing about 3-4 weeks after seed comes up for better growth. You have to remember, the higher the number of deer you may have, will affect the new growth, and as you know, they will hit that plot as soon as the new growth heads out.  Clover is always good, but those seed are $$. Not an expert on this, but have planted plots for 16 years. If you use clove, use Durana clover instead of Whitetail Institues clover, less expensive, last for 5-7 years. Also you can use a product called Barnapoli rape, which is kind of like the vetch, makes vines and is real leafy.

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Posted: 12 April 2012 10:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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i must be doing somethng wrong with turnips. ive planted them 3 years in a row, and have never seen one deer eating the plant, or have any dug up roots. Ive tried most every special food plot mix, but the majority of deer on my farm still seem to like my corn and soybeans instead of any of the high priced specials…...not kidding

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Posted: 14 April 2012 04:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Fior that 2 acres I would do a mix of RR corn and eagle beans if you can find them.  The eagle beans put out tons of leaves and will climb the corn giving the deer cover and food,  my beans 2 uears ago were over 5-6 feet tall in places and that was being browsed to. I mix in sorghum and sometimes sunflowers in with my corn and beans.    I like to use tha mix as a screen around my plots, to give the deer a sense security.  I plant clover, chicory and brassicas in side. 

Here’s a link with some pics of where my plot is this year.  Scroll down to bottom of post
http://ulmf.forumotion.net/t1498-plot-planted-today-rain-on-the-way

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Posted: 07 May 2012 06:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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gonna try the eagle beans for the first time. hope they perform half as good as described.

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Posted: 04 December 2012 06:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Hey Matt, what ever happened here?  We have been the same as you the past few years.  Hoping we have the momentum this winter to get the fields prepped and then planted next year!  Would like to know if you got anything in, what was it, and was it a success?

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Posted: 05 December 2012 08:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Cheap and Easy is fine and dandy, but still takes time and effort.  The effort I have, the time is another story.  Nothing got put in for this season.  I swear (again) its gonna happen next year.

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Posted: 05 December 2012 05:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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I feel your pain, and issue the same swear. smile

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Posted: 11 February 2013 12:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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Through the grapevine, I found a website that a member has devoted a lot of time and effort into foodplot research and has generously shared his experience.  Almost to the point of information overload!  I’ve got a plot I want to revitalize and another I want to establish.  After reading through on the info on that site, I’ve decided on a 3 “crop” rotation.  I’ll be doing portions in perennial clover, annual cereal grain, and brassicas.  None require specialized planting equipment, don’t require a lot of high dollar fertilizer, and will provide year round browse.  There are plenty of farm fields of corn and beans as well as other food sources in my area so I wanted to go with something other than what’s currently available.

Kelly Seed carries most, if not all, the seeds recommended in the mixes at a fraction of the cost of the “big buck” brands.

Corn works, but will not be in the cheap or easy category.  Figure $100 per acre just for fertilizer.  Year old seed can be found for free, but you still need a planter to plant it, and spray weeds at least once. 

My experience with beans is that the deer will hammer them from sprout until mid-August.  Then the leaves turn bitter and they head for the cornfields.  They won’t be too interested in the mature bean pods until late fall.  Beans are cheaper than corn but you will need to spray weeds twice, and you will want to rotate with a non-legume crop (corn, wheat, oats, etc) to prevent disease and insect problems.

Here is the website if anyone is interested in checking it out: http://www.outreachoutdoors.com/phpBB3/viewforum.php?f=19&sid=80d083a661d807e34d295f0b31ad574c  I have no affiliation with it other than spending a lot of time reading through the info.

 

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Posted: 03 March 2013 05:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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Ive been planting food plots for over 30 years. I have tried probably close to a hundred different types of plants, including the many advertised “great/best/whatever” that all the outdoor magazines advertise. Heres what Ive learned in those 30 years:
For Deer, Nothing, and i mean nothing, will beat a field corn/soybean combination.. Nothing! Nada.

The deer eat young bean leaves in the spring and early summer, then pretty much leave them alone until winter. They will eat every single bean during the winter. Deer will eat young corn plant tops (they pull the tops up and out of the stalk, then eat the sweet ends). Bucks use the corn plants all summer for bedding and cover. When winter arrives, they eat corn like humans eat sweetcorn. They will eat every single ear of corn in the field.

Since Ive stayed with strictly corn and beans (dont harvest any), my deer population has expanded tremendously. Plus, I have many more healthy, larger bucks. But you need large enough fields to do the above. A 1/4 acre plot will not be enough. I have a 30 acre field (previously farmed) that i use exclusively for deer….evergreens, prarie grass, shrubs, etc, and about 10 acres of that is in food plots. If you can get the acres, you will have success.

Ive tried to include some photos of what im talking about….how they download.

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Posted: 09 March 2013 08:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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Matt, in the last three years I have planted forage oats,cow peas, ladino, chufa, turnips amd winter wheat. Can’t say one really stands out. The chufa was a total bust I think that stuff needs to be grown a little further down south. This year I am planting a mix a seed dealer mixed for me out of his dealership for some quail and deer it has red top, timothy, and ladino. Might even try some sugar beets. I purchased a ground hog max that fits behind your 4-wheeler for isolated food plots works well if the ground is not to hard. The turnips were not touched till after the season and we had some snow on the ground the last month the deer have been killing them.

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