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Heartland Outdoors Forum | Posting Pics (Thoughts)
 
   
 
Posting Pics (Thoughts)
Posted: 13 November 2015 07:31 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Just trying to get a general consensus of everyone’s thoughts on the topic of posting pictures of game harvested or fish species caught. With Facebook being such a popular part of our social media lives these days, it is very common for people to share pictures on their page for friends and family to view.

The question of the day is. If you were to post a picture of a deer shot or a fish caught on your personal Facebook page and had the privacy setting to private, do you think it is acceptable or morally right for an outdoor magazine to take and use that picture in their magazine without request or notification?

Thoughts?

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Posted: 13 November 2015 08:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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NO!!!!If they made no contact with you to use the picture thats way messed up….Stuff like this is the reason i have never shared harvest pics….

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Posted: 13 November 2015 08:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Anything on the web is fair game I’m guessing.  You’re only screwing yourself by posting pics.  Unwanted trolls will be looking for your spot!

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Posted: 13 November 2015 10:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I understand that once a person posts somthing on Facebook that it’s pretty much public info regardless of the privacy settings that they put in place. My question is directed towards the morality than whether or not privacy laws were broken. If you knew of a outdoor publication that did this sort of thing would you still subscribe or support it?

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Posted: 14 November 2015 09:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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HELL NO!!!!!

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Posted: 14 November 2015 05:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Depends on who and how good it was.  Don’t agree with it but too many people now days just looking for a reason to be offended.

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Posted: 16 November 2015 02:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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My first question in this scenario is this ; if the image had the privacy setting locked down to just friends, or a select list - how did the publication in question even see it? About the only way that would happen is if you are friends with someone on staff - not that you like the publications FB page - again if the viewer isn’t included in the privacy settings - it’s not going to be seen.

If you shared it to the publications page from your page…there will be a slight difference, but again if it’s set to friends only or a select list or completely private it isn’t going to be accessible to a random person/editor looking around facebook.

That said there are indeed some ways that that it still can be found - say a friend downloads and shares it etc.

No, a publication should not just randomly grab images or posts from social media with attribution. However - your public posts, and any images they contain are fair game - But there is also a correct way to do it.

For instance; say there is controversy and I am doing an article on said controversy - I can legally pull a post from social media and include that (if it is set to public) but I have treat it as a quote.  For instance I might include a twitter feed for particular hashtag in a blog entry or article - again, legal but must be treated as a quote.

Images are somewhat different as publication would violate copyright laws if no permission was granted for the use. (it’s a little sticky when it’s part of a post)  It is a myth that any image on the internet is fair game - A HUGE MYTH, it’s also a bit different if it is used editorially vs commercially, and how it was credited/attributed.

Any self respecting publication would certainly contact you and request permission. There are lots of variables. Did you contact the publication and talk with them about the situation? It would be unusual that a FB image would be used in print - the files are usually small and compressed and not print worthy.

Many photographers are really buggy about things like that on social media - the bottom line; if you don’t want to run the risk of someone using the image then don’t put it online anywhere.

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Posted: 16 November 2015 02:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Great info G.  I figured one of you guys would know.  I was guessing

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Posted: 16 November 2015 03:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Excellent info indeed. Not sure specifically how the editor obtained the photo’s, he did not go into detail other than they were taken off of the individuals facebook page. The situation was dealt with in a calm collected manner through a phone conversation. The thing that really just eats at me is that the editor did not, and still does not view the situation as if he did anything wrong. I just wanted to get a feel of what the general consensus was. I didn’t know if I was out of line in my thoughts or if this was a real issue. I fish and hunt public land, and as a general rule I don’t want everyone across the state viewing photos that may have a recognizable backdrop crowding me out. It may sound selfish, but I work very hard at what I do, and if I am successful that’s my information to share, not theirs to boost magazine sales or ratings.

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Posted: 16 November 2015 06:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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It is unfortunate hat the editor doesn’t realize that he did anything wrong. And again - depending on the way it was used etc. he honestly maybe didn’t. While I do post images frequently to social media. they aren’t the images that have already been sold that I think will be used in the near future. In myy case my images are sold on rights managed basis at varying degrees of rights and cost. Often yes, they are re-purposed in other articles, but it depends on the what the original purchaser stipulated in the contract - some only by the least expensive first time rights, some elect to to purchase a limited run, i.e. can’t be sold republished in any other place for a specific time. The exclusive use rights - those are very pricey because the I can’t use or resell that image again.

That said I am still amazed by the number of editors, publishers, and bloggers who feel that it’s perfectly fine to grab an image from google and use it because they still are under the impression that “if it’s out there it’s free game” . I had to sue one now defunct bowfishing magazine for essentially filling an entire issue with my images that they had swiped. Consequently, because I only put small png files online,  the print images were of horrendous quality on top of the theft. It was maddening. The publisher insisted she was using them in fair use news reporting style (which she clearly did understand) the judge did not agree. However, the magazine promptly folded so it was essentially and exercise in futility. They also published a word for word story taken from another publication - I had written it, yet they showed the author as one of their male staff members. They didn’t even bother to remove the phrases (like my husband, and others that made it clear it was written by a female) it appeared they had simply copied and pasted it in it’s entirety. Thankfully that magazine is long gone!

Here’s a link to a really great flow chart that helps make some of this a bit more clear - bottom line take the five minutes and request permission to use it. Also, when taking photos of friends etc. ASK them before posting images of them on social media - many do not want any images of themselves out there.
http://lifehacker.com/follow-this-chart-to-know-if-you-can-use-an-image-from-1615584870

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