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Fence Hunting
Posted: 05 December 2011 03:11 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I’m just wondering what everyone’s thoughts were concerning the proximity of deer stands to a property line.  Legally, you can place a stand right on the line but from an etiquette side, what do you consider should be the distance between a property line and deer stand?

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Posted: 05 December 2011 04:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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5 dead bow shot deer found (3 with arrows still in them) this year alone in my timber. Two tower stands and two tents set up 1-2yds off my line. I have all timber. They have only a dirt field. We all know where the deer will run once shot. Although I still hate the thought of shooting those deer with a gun, at least there is a tiny chance they might die in their tracks. With bow and arrow- there is no chance. I have asked them to considered at least moving out 80 yds. That would at least give a chance of deer dying on their side on line if a good shot happens (but even then its not guaranteed.) So to answer the legal vs. etiquette question- I’d like 80 yds. (but fat chance I’ll ever see that.) smile

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Posted: 05 December 2011 04:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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For me it varies by habitat conditions (open ag field vs CRP vs timber) but my general rule of thumb is half the distance of an average shot (10-15 yds for archery, 25-50 yds for shotgun). Those are the rules I live by. We’ve seen stands that our neighbors have set up right on the fenceline, but so far they haven’t led to any altercations. There’s really no legal basis for this so I try really hard not to let it bother me.

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Posted: 05 December 2011 04:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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I think a good distance would be 70-80 yards, but that is not always possible. 40 yards would be the closest I would ever go. It also depends on what kind of relationship you have with your neighbor. If you don’t get along at all and you hit a buck of a lifetime on your side and it runs over to his side, whats the chances of him letting you retreive it? To me setting up closer to the line wouldn’t be worth it. What I really don’t like is when their deerstand on the line faces your land.

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Posted: 05 December 2011 05:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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No fence-line hunting for me, I dont how the neighbors are set up and i DO NOT wanna be in the middle of a crossfire situation. It happened once and i gave up gun hunting on the spot…Bowhunting depends on the lay of the ground….And only after i talk too the neighbors too see where they are set-up….

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Posted: 05 December 2011 08:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I agree it depends on the relationship with your neighbor. However, having a deer stand set up facing your property makes you think, and probably mad as well. I think its best to stick to your side of the fence with a 20 yd distance or more..

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Posted: 05 December 2011 09:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Well if one has the timber (shelter) and the other has the field(food to grow the bigger, corn/bean fed deer) seems like the field guy is giving someone a free food plot.
Hard to find fault about that relationship. But we try really hard to make an argument.  Perhaps a really high fence is in order and then we could see how many deer stick around.

 

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Posted: 05 December 2011 09:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Mallardmike are they scared to ask you for permission to retrieve their deer? i personally believe if someone shoots one and it goes on your property it is only right to let them retrieve it because the tables may be turned one day with a buck of a lifetime…i try to keep peace with conjoining neighbors just for this reason

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Posted: 06 December 2011 09:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Jordn88- I agree 100% if a deer travels a reasonable distance and then goes across the property line. 1-3 yds just isn’t a reasonable distance. I am the leasee on this property for many many yrs but it is not the property where I live. I have retrieved many deer for them over the last few yrs.  The actual owner of the land found out and said no more. It is out of hand in his opinion. They shoot, they call me or the land owner and say can you go get our deer.  Then all the safe havens we worked hard to create for them are ruined. I HATE to see waste and hoped they would see it the same way and move these tower stands off the line and out into their dirt field. I explained for whatever reason the landowner has a strict policy. So any deer they shoot that close to the line more than likely will be wasted and it is not always practical to call me to drive a cpl hrs to sneak in and retreive their deer. Their reaction was “well we will have to shoot even more hoping to drop one on our side then.” (knowing full well not a single deer they have shot has ever died in that 1-3 yd space.) In a perfect world- everyone would get along etc… I just hate line hunting when your side of the line has no CHANCE of legally recovering. (Yes- virtualSniper it is legal. I just question the ethics. But I do have food on the other 3 sides. As I said it is a “dirt field” not a free food plot. That’s why I am so frustrated.) As I said, I have only FOUND 5 deer (3 still with arrows in them) who knows how many more have been wasted.

In total agreement that in a perfect world all parties would “work together” when it comes to hunting but unfortunately this isn’t always the case. I also do not consider those deer “my deer” by any means. I am just against waste when you know the rules. I can’t do anything about it. It is legal. Just not ethical at that distance in answer to the original question poised.

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Posted: 13 December 2011 01:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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We have a similar situation on our ground - we have all the timber and there is a treestand on a tree that is literally on the fence - the tree has grown up through the fence - on the other side of the fence is cattle pasture with cattle in it.  I have found three gut piles 60 yards into our property, blood trails to the fence and hair and blood on the fence for three years in a row, yet the CO tells me there is nothing we can do unless the poacher is caught in the act, either by him or on video by us.

I try not to let it bother me thinking this poacher will get his due when he tries to “fit through the eye of the needle” but this is just plain wrong whether it’s legal or not.  People who do this are not hunters, they are just shooters.  Have enough respect for yourself to find a place to hunt where you’re not shooting over a fence.

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